Image from page 73 of “The Cleveland medical journal” (1907)

Image from page 73 of “The Cleveland medical journal” (1907)
Prostate Cancer Symptoms
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Identifier: clevelandmedical06clev
Title: The Cleveland medical journal
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Medicine Medicine
Publisher: Cleveland : The Cleveland Medical Journal Company
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and the National Endowment for the Humanities

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Fig. IV. Sarcoma of kidney—the only symptom for se veral months was hematuria.

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Fig. III. Showing large renal calculus, which caused hemorrhage but no pain. Lower—Some Causes of Hematuria 59 of the prostate involving the bladder with profuse hemorrhage.Cancer of the prostate constitutes 6% of all prostatics. Thecombined hypertrophied and malignant prostates were 10.5% ofthe causes producing hematuria. In 12.5% of the cases thecause of hemorrhage was papillomata of the bladder. In no casewere there any vesical symptoms before infection took place andthe first symptom in all cases was bleeding. After infection,vesical irritation and tenesmus were marked. Tumors of largesize may be present in the bladder without any symptoms, as willbe noted in the specimen from case 33 (Fig. I). In this case therewp.s no symptom other than the bleeding, yet the growth musthave been there for years. In case 67 the first hemorrhageoccurred 10 years ago, evidently the beginning of the trouble;the symptoms in this case became annoying only after the bladderwas infected. In case 24 th

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Image from page 219 of “Western field” (1902)

Image from page 219 of “Western field” (1902)
Big 12 tournament
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Identifier: westernfield101907olym
Title: Western field
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protective Associations
Subjects: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protectice Associations Sports
Publisher: San Francisco
Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library

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used intracking desperadoes, the government may use blood-hounds to run down horsethieves and cattle rust-lers. Portland Lord Shoho Douglas I. a cocker spanielowned by George Withrow of Arlington, Ore., wasdrowned in the Columbia River recently in goingunder the thin ice. The animal was among the fore-most cocker spaniels in the Pacific Northwest, hav-ing taken first honors at Spokane, Portland andSalem shows, winning also the McCartney trophy atthe Portland Kennel Club in 1905. Sportsmen in the Coeur d.Mcncs of northernIdaho are organizing local gun clubs to prepare rep-resentatives for the big tournament under theauspices of the Spokane Rod and Gun Club Septem-ber 10-12. when it is expected to have some of thecrack trapshooters from the Pacific Coast, as wellas the East and Middle West, participate in the threedays shoot. The first club to organize in the min-ing belt was called into being at Mullan recently,those behind the movement being John Mocine,Charles Cartwrigbt and M. Reno.

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(3 TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS OF THECOPONADO COUNTRY CLUB Hv AuniiK 1>

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Image from page 44 of “The analysis of multichannel two-dimensional random signals” (1718)

Image from page 44 of “The analysis of multichannel two-dimensional random signals” (1718)
Epl Results
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Identifier: analysisofmultic00ther
Title: The analysis of multichannel two-dimensional random signals
Year: 1718 (1710s)
Authors: Therrien, Charles W.
Subjects: SPECTRUM ANALYSIS. PREDICTIONS. MULTICHANNEL. LINEAR SYSTEMS. IMAGE PROCESSING. SIGNAL PROCESSING.
Publisher: Monterey, California : Naval Postgraduate School
Contributing Library: Naval Postgraduate School, Dudley Knox Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Naval Postgraduate School, Dudley Knox Library

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CO • • • (a) 2-D data 1st prediction direction

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K ■H 2nd prediction direction(b) Multichannel data Figure 3.8 Multichannel 2-D linear prediction and related multichannel 1-D problem. 33 where each block a*, is of size M x M. The a[n) are found by solving the equation R olPx = R a i) a (Fi-l] 0 (3.26) where EPl is the P2M x P2M prediction error covariance and where the correlation matrixappearing on the left side of (3.26) is the same as that in (3.12). Now post mulitply bothsides of Eq. (3.26) by the term A(0) and compare the result to Eq. (3.12). In view of Eqs(3.10) and (3.13), Eq. (3.26) will be identical to Eq. (3.12) if we require EFlA(0) =S(0) (3.27) and 0,1,. ..,Pi -1 (3.28) The foregoing equations show that the multichannel 2-D Normal equations can besolved by the following steps. First solve the P2M-dimensional 1-D multichannel problem(3.26). Since this problem is 1-D, the multichannel Levinson recursion can be employedto find the coefficient matrices aSn^ and the prediction error covariance matrix EPl. Nextsolve (3.27)

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Image from page 125 of “Marvels of the new West : a vivid portrayal of the stupendous marvels in the vast wonderland west of the Missouri River : comprising marvels of nature, marvels of race, marvels of enterprise, marvels of mining, marvels of stock-rai

Image from page 125 of “Marvels of the new West : a vivid portrayal of the stupendous marvels in the vast wonderland west of the Missouri River : comprising marvels of nature, marvels of race, marvels of enterprise, marvels of mining, marvels of stock-rai
The Shape Of Water
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Identifier: marvelsofnewwest1889thay
Title: Marvels of the new West : a vivid portrayal of the stupendous marvels in the vast wonderland west of the Missouri River : comprising marvels of nature, marvels of race, marvels of enterprise, marvels of mining, marvels of stock-raising, and marvels of agriculture, graphically and truthfully described
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Thayer, William Makepeace, 1820-1898
Subjects:
Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : Henry Bill Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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blimity. Yosemite is a chasm rather than a valley; averaging one-halfmile in width, and from six to eight miles in length, completely sur-rounded by a perpendicular granite wall from a half-mile to a mile inheight. At Inspiration Point the wonders of the valley burstupon the view. If the tourists head is level, he can look straightdown five thousand feet. Cathedral Rock lifts its peak high into the air, and stands outprominently in the grand panorama. The ** Rock is two thousandsix hundred and eighty feet high, and its loftiest peak rises five hun-dred feet higher, its magnificent proportions presenting a scene of sur-prising grandeur. Six Washington monuments, one upon another, 84 MARVELS OF THE NEW WEST. scarcely cover the height of these tremendous *Rocks. The writerjust quoted says : — * Here and there are grand massive domes, as perfect in shape as-Bostons State-house dome, and bigger than the entire of a dozenState-houses. The highest rock of the valley is a perfect half-dome.

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CATHEDRAL ROCK. split sharp and square in the middle, and rising near a mile (or fivethousand feet), — as high as Mount Washington is above the level ofthe sea, — over the little lake which perfectly mirrors its majesticform at its foot. Perfect pyramids take their places in the wall;.then these pyramids come in families, and mount away one after andabove the other, asThe Three Brothers. The Cathedral Rocksand * The Cathedral Spires unite the great impressiveness, the MARVELS OF NATURE. «5

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Image from page 166 of “William H. Seward’s travels around the world” (1873)

Image from page 166 of “William H. Seward’s travels around the world” (1873)
white fur shawl
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Identifier: williamhsewardst01sewa
Title: William H. Seward’s travels around the world
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872 Seward, Olive Risley, 1844-1906
Subjects: Voyages around the world
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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eau on end,is covered with a gay shawl, and a mirror four inches square, witha gilt-frame, borrowed from the Ashuelot, hangs above it. Forsofas, they use trunks spread with a white Thibetian fur great-coat, which Mr. Seward has kindly contributed. The access to thiselegant saloon, which is eight feet square, is not particularly con-venient—an aperture in the front, two feet square, with a descentof three feet, without steps or ladder. In going in one stoops andsteps backward ; in coming out, one stoops, and is pulled upward.Our habit of travel is settled. The fleet moves, or is supposed tomove, at dawn. We are served with hot tea and a biscuit, with thethermometer somewhere between freezing and 40°. We draw CHINESE AGRICULTURE. 119 water from the river, for the toilet, in preference to that which wasfrozen during the night in our pitchers. We make ourselves warmby a walk of two or three miles. In these walks, we stare andwonder at the uncouth ploughs, the awkward fanning-mills, and

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CHXSESE AGKICtTLTUEE. other rude farming implements, and the equally strange farm-housesand dwellings which we pass. What seems stranger than any thing else is the absence ofdomestic animals. Horses, cows, and oxen, are indeed sometimesseen at the plough, but generally the ground is worked with spadeand hoe. ]STo wheeled vehicle, except rarely a cart, with a mean 120 JAPAN, CHINA, AND COCHIN CHINA. calash, drawn by a horse, a mule, or oxen, is seen. Forty sheep hereare a fortune. Mr. Berghs sensibilities would be sorely tried if hecould see the burdens and labors imposed on the ass. The hogs are black as the ace of spades, about as thin, and more scarce thanpheasants. Sometimes we take one side of the river, and thencross to the other. Not unfrequently, by the intervention of head-land and promontory, we lose sight of our little fleet, or, finding itin disorder, mistake number two for number four, or the admiralsflag for the consul-generals. Coming in from these walks, wegather round

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